Touring and 4X4

Below is a new and growing collection of scenic touring and 4X4 trail reports, traveling through the beautiful Colorado landscape.

Touring

For the sake of this website, touring refers to roads that are suitable for all types of stock vehicles in good weather, and are usually paved.

Pikes Peak (14,110′), Front Range

Pikes Peak (14,110′), Front Range

Pikes Peak is the highest summit of the southern Front Range of the Rocky Mountains in North America. The prominent 14,115-foot (4,302.31 m) fourteener is located in Pike National Forest, 12 miles (19 km) west of downtown Colorado Springs, Colorado.  The summit is...

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Shelf Road (9,494′), Fourmile Canyon

Shelf Road (9,494′), Fourmile Canyon

Shelf Road Gold Belt Tour National Scenic Byway is a dirt road passable with a 2WD vehicle in good weather. It follows the old stagecoach route between Cripple Creek and  Cañon City built in 1892. It twists along Fourmile Creek, with long bands of limestone towering...

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Flat Tops Scenic Byway (10,343′), Flat Tops

Flat Tops Scenic Byway (10,343′), Flat Tops

Flat Tops Trail Scenic Byway (County Road 8), runs through the northern portion of the Flat Tops Wilderness. The Flat Tops is Colorado's second largest Wilderness, spanning a total of 235,214 acres. The Flat Tops are part of the White River Plateau, with an average...

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Garden of the Gods (6,400′)          Front Range

Garden of the Gods (6,400′) Front Range

Garden of the Gods is a geologically unique 480 acre park, having one of the most complete and complex exposures of earth's history anywhere in the country. It is popular for hiking, technical rock climbing, biking, and horseback riding. There are more than 15 miles...

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Mt Evans (14,264′), Front Range

Mt Evans (14,264′), Front Range

Mt Evans can be accessed via the highest paved road in North America, reaching an elevation of 14,130'. The Mount Evans Scenic Byway, maintained by the Forest Service, offers easy access to Colorado’s inspiring high mountain environment. A drive up, and short walk to...

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4X4

In order to get a sense of how difficult a trail is, never use pictures as your guide, they are always misleading. This site uses 4 difficulty levels to loosely rate each 4×4 trail included in the trip reports at the time it was traveled. Due to the nature of these trails, difficulty can increase without warning. None of the trails on this site exceeded a Difficult rating.

EASY – Good choice for beginners. Gravel or natural surface roads with small obstacles

MODERATE – Typically natural surface with no maintenance except for erosion control. Small to moderate obstacles that can usually be avoided. Driver with experience is needed to do this in a stock vehicle.

DIFFICULT – Natural surface with no maintenance except for erosion control. Moderate obstacles requiring you to pick a safe path. Modified vehicle and experienced driver recommended.

EXTREME – Roads with large obstacles. Experienced drivers and modified vehicles required. Vehicle most likely will sustain damage.

Mosquito Pass (13,185′), Mosquito Range

Mosquito Pass (13,185′), Mosquito Range

Mosquito Pass was built to connect the towns of Alma to the east, with Leadville to the west. It is the highest crossable vehicle mountain pass in the U.S. outside of Alaska. While there are higher vehicle passes, they are all out and back. The trail crosses the...

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Stony Pass (12,592′), San Juan Range

Stony Pass (12,592′), San Juan Range

Stony Pass Rd crosses the Continental Divide and follows small streams that make up the headwaters of the Rio Grande River. The road was created in 1872 to connect the area’s mining operations in Silverton to the town of Del Norte. The Continental Divide Trail crosses...

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Hayden Pass (10,709′), Sangre de Cristo Range

Hayden Pass (10,709′), Sangre de Cristo Range

Hayden Pass road crosses the Sangre de Cristo Mountains between Villa Grove in the west, and Coaldale to the east. The road is most challenging and scenic when started from Villa Grove, on the southwest side. With grades up to 20%, great views of the San Luis valley...

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Tincup Pass (12,154′), Sawatch Range

Tincup Pass (12,154′), Sawatch Range

Tincup Pass gets its name from prospector Jim Taylor, who in 1860 brought his gold strike back to camp in his tin cup. The pass was used to move supplies between St. Elmo and the town of Tin Cup starting in 1881, when a wagon road was built. The views and hiking...

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