Blodgett Peak (9,429′), Front Range

Blodgett Peak (9,429′), Front Range

Blodgett Peak (9,429′), Front Range

Blodgett Peak is located in Blodgett Peak Open Space along the Rampart Range of the Rocky Mountains. The peak has a small summit that provides unobstructed views in all directions, rising from the eastern edge of the Rockies. The trailhead is situated close to the U.S. Air Force Academy, north of Colorado Springs.

Elevation Map Pancake Rocks

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Trail Directions

The Blodgett Peak trailhead begins in the Blodgett Peak Open Space. Heading out from the parking lot the easiest path to navigate is the closed road, which leads to the water tower.

Take the social trail below the water tower to continue to the peak. The trail will wind into a canyon and begin gaining elevation more quickly. Loose scree and a steep route define this section of the trail.

The social trail leads through the Waldo Canyon wildfire scar, where there is less scree and better footing. Once on the ridge, head to the right (east) to reach the summit. There is a short boulder field scramble to the small summit.

Trailhead Directions

Humboldt Peak (14,064′), Sangre de Cristo Range

Humboldt Peak (14,064′), Sangre de Cristo Range

Humboldt Peak (14,064′), Sangre de Cristo Range

Humboldt Peak is part of the Crestones in the rugged Sangre de Cristo mountain range. The Crestones are a cluster of 14,000′ peaks comprising Crestone Peak, Crestone Needle, Kit Carson Peak, Challenger Point, Humboldt Peak, and Columbia Point. Humboldt Peak is the least difficult hike (difficult Class 2). The rest of the Crestone Group is Class 3, 4, and 5 climbing.

As the trail winds up Humboldt Peak you pass the South Colony Lakes, the most popular back country camping site in the Sangre de Cristo Range.

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Trail Directions

The trail climbs the peak from the South Colony Lakes basin, accessed from the east side of the range. This basin is a popular site that is also the base for most climbs of Crestone Peak and Crestone Needle. You start the hike on a very rugged four-wheel drive road that was closed in 2009 as it follows the South Colony drainage.

Once near the lakes there will be Forest Service signs providing information on the area. Going NW (Humboldt Peak cutoff trail) at the junction, takes you to the Upper South Colony Lake.

The trail climbs steeply to the ridge from the upper lake. Once on the ridge stay to the center for the safest scramble to the summit. The northern side is treacherous with a steep drop for most of the remaining route.

Once on the false summit, head to the northeast to the true summit along large talus.

Trailhead Directions

Mt Audubon (13,223′), Front Range

Mt Audubon (13,223′), Front Range

Mt Audubon (13,223′), Front Range

Mt Audubon is the highest peak in the Indian Peaks Wilderness that has an established trail nearly to the summit. It is located in the Brainard Lake Recreation Area, about an hour outside of Boulder.

The great 360 degree view from the summit looks out over the mountains of the Indian Peaks Wilderness to the west, Rocky Mountain National Park to the north, and the Front Range and plains to the east. Beautiful alpine lakes like Mitchell and Blue Lake are scattered in the valleys.

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Trail Directions

The Beaver Creek Trail enters the Indian Peaks Wilderness and climbs through the trees for 1.7 miles. At the first junction head west (left) onto the Mount Audubon Trail as it heads west.

The Mount Audubon Trail continues climbing above timberline. The trail ends at the saddle where, there is a view down into the Coney Lake drainage. For the final half-mile, and 600 vertical feet, follow the rock cairns up the talus to the summit.

Trailhead Directions

Hallett Peak (12,713′), Front Range

Hallett Peak (12,713′), Front Range

Hallett Peak (12,713′), Front Range

Hallett Peak, viewed from east Rocky Mountain National Park, is distinctive with it’s slanted square structure towering over the landscape. As you near the summit however, the square melts away and you are left looking at a more traditional mountain silhouette. Rising along the Continental Divide, Hallett Peak divides Chaos Canyon to the south and Tyndall Gorge to the north.

The route to the summit first traverses the summit of Flattop Mountain on a well maintained trail. The Arapaho Indians called the Flattop Mountain corridor “The Big Trail”. The trail was formally constructed in 1925, was rehabilitated by the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1940, and is currently listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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Trail Directions

From Bear Lake take the well maintained Flattop mountain trail to the summit of Flattop Mountain. No maintained trail reaches Hallett Peak, so cross the saddle above Tyndall Glacier and scramble up steep talus to the summit.

Trailhead Directions

Picket Wire Canyonlands Tracksite (4,403′), Eastern Plains

Picket Wire Canyonlands Tracksite (4,403′), Eastern Plains

Picket Wire Canyonlands Tracksite (4,403′), Eastern Plains

Picket Wire (Purgatoire) Canyonlands, in the Comanche National Grasslands, is home to the largest dinosaur track site in North America. 150 million years ago this area was part of a large shallow lake and was teaming with Brontosaurs and Allosaurs. As these massive beasts plodded along the muddy edge of this lake, they left their footprints in the mud, which were eventually buried and turned to stone. Today, over 1,300 of these footprints, extending a 1/4 mile, are exposed at the Picket Wire Canyonlands dinosaur track site.

Another interesting geological attraction on the Eastern Plains is Paint Mines Park, with it’s richly colored clay spires.

Ranger led vehicle access can be arranged in advance during certain times. Vehicle access does not traverse same trail.

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Trail Directions

There are no navigation issues with the trail. The reason for the difficulty rating is the distance.

Starting at the Withers Canyon Trailhead, the trail descends 250 feet into the canyons. Along the way you will encounter many ruins including the Dolores Mission and Cemetery. Many rocks above the trail have centuries old petroglyphs left behind by nomadic tribes.

Trailhead Directions

Crater Lake (10,400′) and Mirror Lake (10,325′), Front Range

Crater Lake (10,400′) and Mirror Lake (10,325′), Front Range

Crater Lake (10,400′) and Mirror Lake (10,325′), Front Range

Mirror Lake and Crater lake are found deep in the heart of the Indian Peaks Wilderness. Cascade Falls is a popular destination found along the trail. It is about 4.5 miles in and comprises of multiple waterfalls.

The destination, Crater Lake, sits in a large bowl under Mount Achonee (12,469′), Lone Eagle Peak (11,920′) and several unnamed 12,000′ peaks. Peck Glacier and several perennial snowfields can be seen clinging to the steep terrain west of Lone Eagle Peak. This trail is rated as moderate, but if done in a single day the mileage would make this a difficult hike.

The Indian Peaks Wilderness encompasses over 50 lakes 133 miles of trails, with many other beautiful destinations such as Mt Audubon and Mitchell Lake.

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Trail Directions

The trail begins along the west shore of Monarch Lake. The trail is level as it follows the northern shore of the lake. There are occasional switchbacks as the trail follows Buchanan Creek through pine, aspen, and spruce forests. There are several waterfalls along Buchanan Creek and later along Cascade Creek, including Cascade Falls.

There are two trail junctions, both of which are clearly marked. At ~3.5 miles stay right on the Cascade Trail at the junction for Buchanan Pass Trail. At the junction ~6.5 miles, stay right to head toward Crater Lake. The trail to the left continues to Pawnee Pass Trail. After a short climb you’ll come to an open meadow with a large boulder field on the left-hand side. The trail crosses a large flat rock bed and is marked by 5-6 cairns. After following the cairns back onto the clearly defined trail, several steep switchbacks take you up to the basin.

The trail appears to end at Mirror Lake as you walk around the side (right) of the lake, but the trail picks up on the west side of Mirror Lake and takes you to Crater Lake, a very short distance.

Trailhead Directions

West Spanish Peak (13,625′), Sangre de Cristo Range

West Spanish Peak (13,625′), Sangre de Cristo Range

West Spanish Peak (13,625′), Sangre de Cristo Range

West Spanish Peak (13,625′) and East Spanish Peak (12,684′) have world class geological features that made the two peaks a National Natural Landmark in 1976 and designated as a Wilderness Area in 2000. The peaks rise 6,000 ft from the edge of the eastern plains, and were used as a navigation aid for centuries for people heading west.

The Spanish Peaks are world class examples of “stocks” and “dikes”. Stocks are large masses of igneous (molten) rock which forced their way into seams of the sedimentary rock which eroded more quickly over time. East Peak is a nearly circular stock about 5.5 miles long by 3 miles wide while West Peak is a stock about 2.75 miles long by 1.75 miles wide.

The other structures, hundreds of dikes which radiate out from the two mountains, were formed in the same way, but instead of a large pool of molten rock, the magma filled cracks in the soft sedimentary layer. Erosion wore away the softer sedimentary rock leaving dikes (walls) of granite rock up to 100′ high, 100′ wide, and 14 miles long. This scenic combination of two stocks (West Spanish Peak and East Spanish Peak) and hundreds of unique dikes is second to none with it’s size, diversity and beauty.

While in the area, just a short drive west on Hwy 160, is another geological wonder, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve. Zapata Falls, which lies just outside the park, is also a favorite.

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While the Spanish Peaks are categorized as belonging to the Sangre de Cristo Mountain Range, the are not geologically part of a chain of mountains, having been formed independently by different processes.

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Trail Directions

The trail is fairly level as it meanders through forests and meadows for about 2 miles (3.2 km) to treeline. At treeline there is a massive cairn signaling the beginning of the steep section of the trail. There is a rough path on talus (scree) up the southwest ridge of the peak for the 1.5 miles (2.4 km) of steep climbing. When in doubt stay to the left and close to the ridge, the climbing is on more solid footing.

Gaining the false summit, the actual summit comes into view, not far away and on much more even terrain. There is a cairn and large branch on the summit.

Trailhead Directions

La Plata Peak (14,336′), Sawatch Range

La Plata Peak (14,336′), Sawatch Range

La Plata Peak (14,336′), Sawatch Range

La Plata Peak is known for it’s distinctive Ellingwood Ridge, and is one of the highest 14,000′ peaks in Colorado. Traverseing the Southwest Ridge route, with Huron Peak and the Three Apostles providing a backdrop, makes for stunning scenery. 

“La Plata” is Spanish for “The Silver”, a reference to the many silver deposits in the area. You can find remnants of old mines along the trail.

The Sawatch Mountain Range is home to fourteen other 14,000′ peaks, such as Huron Peak, Mt Antero, Missouri Mountain, and the highest peak in the Rocky Mountains, Mt Elbert.

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Trail Directions

Note: The West Winfield trailhead is small and very hard to reach, even during dry conditions due to the rough 4X4 road.

Once at the trailhead head directly north and cross a small creek and turn west for a bit. Following the steep trail you reach treeline at about 12,000′. Here the elevation levels out and you navigate through a large bog overgrown with willows. Expect to get your boots muddy here. Past the bog, you can see the steep trail which climbs to the ridge. Be careful here because of the loose rock and lack of traction, especially on the way down. Once on the ridge, the trail turns northeast and traverses the cliffs you viewed all morning. The trail steepens considerably again and gains 1,000′ in a very short distance, boulder hopping all the way to the top of the ridge. Once on the ridge, continue climbing over two false summits. The trail joins the Northwest Slopes standard route (#1474) for the last 20 feet to the summit of La Plata Peak.

Trailhead Directions

Cheyenne Mountain (9,565′), Front Range

Cheyenne Mountain (9,565′), Front Range

Cheyenne Mountain (9,565′), Front Range

Cheyenne Mountain’s is a triple peak mountain with the geological summit on the southwestern portion of the mountain. In 2017 there were no trails to the summit, so it was necessary to navigate most of the way without a trail through the Pike National Forest. In late 2018, Cheyenne Mountain State Park completed the Talon/Dixon 15.6 mile trail to the summit.

Pikes Peak, Almagre Mountain, and Mt Rosa are nearby neighbors that are also worth a visit while in the area.

The mountain serves as a host for military, communications, recreational, and residential functions. The underground operations center for the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) was built during the Cold War to monitor North American airspace for missile launches and military aircraft. Built deep within the granite, it was designed to withstand bombing and fallout from a nuclear war. Many of its functions were transferred to Peterson Air Force Base in 2006.

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Trail Directions

The most direct route begins alongside Old Stage Road. Old Stage road/368 climbs up a valley along the west side of Cheyenne Mountain from Colorado Springs. There is a turnout for about 3 cars across the street from where the trek starts (see pictures and Directions). Once across the street the most direct path to the summit is to head east-northeast until the summit ridge where you will turn north-northeast.

After climbing a fairly steep section after the road, things flatten out as you traverse the ridge of a smaller hill. There is a faint trail heading to the northeast along this section, follow it. 50 feet before the end of the faint trail head east and down a shallow gully before heading up to the summit ridge. There is very deep forest and brush in this section, so look for the path of least resistance. This sections gets steeper as you near the summit ridge.

Once on the summit ridge you will see the true summit to the north-northeast. Cross one more shallow gully before heading up to the summit.

Trailhead Directions

Longs Peak (14,255′), Front Range

Longs Peak (14,255′), Front Range

Longs Peak (14,255′), Front Range

Iconic Longs Peak (14,259′) is the highest mountain in Rocky Mountain National Park, and the northern most 14,000′ peak in the Rocky Mountains.

The peak is guarded by granite cliffs and does require Class 3 climbing, although the first 6.5 miles before the Keyhole are Class 2. Stepping through the Keyhole is an exhilarating experience, with thousand foot drop offs and endless views.

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Trail Directions

There are many spectacular ways to summit Long’s Peak, and this description highlights the “standard” Keyhole Route. The route has two sides to it, a long approach with a little scramble to the keyhole, and from the keyhole to the summit which is rated as a Class 3 Grade 3 scramble/climb.

The standard route on Longs Peak is called the Keyhole route and it is usually done in one very long day. It is the route described below.

From the East Longs Peak trailhead follow the well maintained trail through pine forests. You reach a trail junction to Eugenia Mine Trail/Storm Pass after 0.45 miles. Continue straight along the East Longs Peak trail as it turns southwest through dense forest, gaining elevation through steep switchbacks. As the trail turns west, you pass through Goblins Forest, 1.1 miles in, and cross small creeks before climbing more switchbacks. As you approach treeline, you cross beautiful Alpine Brook on a well maintained footbridge, 1.85 miles in.

Leaving Alpine Brook the trail travels south through krummholtz and provides beautiful views of Twin Sisters Peaks to the east. The trail eventually leaves the low growth stands of krummholtz behind and enters alpine tundra, providing spectacular views of Longs Peak Diamond, a 1,000′ sheer cliff. The trail moderately climbs until it reaches Jims Grove Trail Junction, and then turns southwest along the basin until it arrives at Mills Moraine.

Here, there is a trail junction with Chasm Lake 3.25 miles in. Continue to follow the the East Longs Peak trail as it turns northwest going around to the east of Mt Lady Washington, climbing to Granite Pass, 4.3 miles in. At a trail junction on Granite Pass, the North Longs Peak Trail merges from the north. Continue on the East Longs Peak trail as it swings southwest along switchbacks and eventually enters the Boulderfield at the base of Long’s north face, where the East Longs Peak trail ends at a campsite area 5.9 miles in.

From the end of the East Longs Peak trail, the next destination is the Keyhole (.4 miles) to the southwest across the Boulderfield. The Keyhole is a weakness in the ridge between Longs Peak and Storm Peak, providing the only non-technical passage to the west side of the mountain along this route.

Scramble across large granite boulders until close to the keyhole, where the last 100 yards become increasingly steep. The Keyhole is a striking rock feature with a large overhang and a rock shelter built along the southeast side. Stepping through the Keyhole is one of the major highlights of the trip. The spectacular Glacier Gorge with its beautiful lakes and 13,000′ peaks come into view along with a 3,000′ drop. The exposure feels big, and some decide that the Keyhole is far enough. Knowing when to stop is honored wisdom. The way forward from here is much more rugged and dangerous than what has been encountered so far, and marked only with bullseyes.

Once across the Keyhole, turn immediately to the (left) and locate “The Ledges” (0.4 miles, 120′ elev. gain), a horizontal route marked by red and yellow bullseyes. The Ledges gradually head south, up and down over the tops of massive slabs of granite that rise from the side of the mountain. There is a v-shaped notch between boulders, with an iron rod as an aid through the most difficult section.

Next, the Trough (0.3 miles, 600′ elev. gain) consists of steep, rock-filled gully. At the top there is a large boulder jammed between the walls of the Trough as it narrows, blocking the route. Getting around it is one of the most difficult parts of the route.

At the top of the Trough there is a rock shelf called The Narrows (0.2 miles, 120′ elevation gain) providing a route across the near shear south face of the mountain. The ledge is fairly narrow initially, giving this portion of the route its name.

The Homestretch (0.2 miles, 280′ elev. gain) is the last obstacle to the summit, and consists of mostly smooth exposed granite, steep enough to require scrambling on all fours. It is climbed north-northeast to the top of the mountain. A large cairn marks the gateway to the top. The large flat summit is covered with rough talus. Enjoy the incredible views!

Trailhead Directions

Mt Sneffels (14,150′), San Juan Range

Mt Sneffels (14,150′), San Juan Range

Mt Sneffels (14,150′), San Juan Range

Mt Sneffels is the second highest summit in the San Juan mountains and known as the “Queen of the San Juans”. Mt Sneffels is situated in the Mt Sneffels Wilderness of the Uncompahgre National Forest. There are only 15 miles of constructed trails in the 16,587 acre wilderness, making it truly wild.

Starting at the upper trailhead involves a rough road accessible with a 4WD vehicle. The lower trailhead is more accessible to 2WD vehicles, 1.25 miles below the upper trailhead.

The San Juan Range is home to world class outdoor recreation. American Basin, California & Hurricane Pass, and Stony Pass are a couple of examples of the natural beauty of the area.

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Trail Directions

The route description follows the standard route via Lavender Couloir.

From the Yankee Boy upper trailhead follow the trail until you reach the Blue Lakes Trail junction. Head right at the junction, hiking up a low-grade rocky trail before turning right up a steep gully. Continue for around 500 ft vertical gain up the loose dirt/gravel on unclear trail. Despite its grade, there are no switchbacks here, so this bit is brutal.

Reach a saddle at 13,500 ft, and turn left up Lavender Couloir. This gully is of similar grade but composed primarily if larger talus blocks. It funnels hikers up to just below 14,000 ft. This part of the mountain is fairly shaded, so the top if often full of snow into July. As the gully narrows and becomes cliffed out near the top, angle to the left, and pass through a V-notch (the most difficult part). Continue along a vague trail, angling up and to the right. The summit is only about 100 ft up and is clear from this point. Hike up along some solid rock to reach the summit.

Trailhead Directions

Huron Peak (14,003′), Sawatch Range

Huron Peak (14,003′), Sawatch Range

Huron Peak (14,003′), Sawatch Range

Huron Peak is known as one of the most beautiful hikes in the Sawatch Mountain Range of Colorado. It is the most remote peak in the range, located within the San Isabel Nation Forest, and offers views of wilderness in every direction from it’s small summit.

It’s not entirely clear how the peak got it’s name, but the most likely is that Huron Peak is named after a North American tribe. Huron Peak wasn’t officially recognized as a 14er until 1956, when the U.S.G.S recorded it’s height for the first time.

The Sawatch Mountain Range is home to fourteen other 14,000′ peaks, such as La Plata Peak, Missouri Mountain, Mt Antero, and the highest peak in the Rocky Mountains, Mt Elbert.

According to the book “A Climbing Guide to Colorado’s Fourteeners“ documented evidence shows that the highest point of the Three Apostles, Ice Mountain was not climbed until October 4, 1931 by a man named John L. Hart. For mountains in Colorado that is actually a very late date for a first ascent to happen which just shows how isolated and steep the area is.

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Trail Directions

From the trail-head hike up through the forest for about .5 mile. Cross a small stream and follow the numerous switchbacks on a steep hillside. Near 11,700, there’s an excellent view of The Three Apostles, all 13,000′ mountains. The trail eventually turns east, approaching a high basin northwest of Huron.

Hike out of the basin onto the upper slopes and eventually crest the north ridge. Follow the trail west onto Huron’s northwest face and ascend a steep, rocky pitch before returning (left) to the crest of the north ridge. Once you’re on the north ridge again, hike a short ways to the summit and enjoy the amazing views.

Trailhead Directions

St Vrain Mountain Trail (12,162′), Front Range

St Vrain Mountain Trail (12,162′), Front Range

St Vrain Mountain Trail (12,162′), Front Range

The St Vrain Mountain trail is located just outside the border of the Indian Peaks Wilderness Area to the south, and Rocky Mountain National Park to the north. The trail climbs steeply heading west, just east of the Continental Divide, with views across the Middle St Vrain Creek drainage and the Wild Basin Area of Rocky Mountain National Park.

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Trail Directions

The trail climbs up the valley’s north side to the Indian Peaks Wilderness Boundary. The trail then switchbacks hard left (west) one final time) before turning sharply south across the valley. Grades briefly moderate and then steepen back up the south valley wall, turning sharply south one last time before clearing treeline (2.65 miles : 10,765′).

Travel eases along a broad tundra saddle between the shoulders of Meadow Mountain (11,632′), an unnamed peak, and St Vrain Mountain. It reaches the Rocky Mountain National Park Boundary (3.15 miles : 11,180′) and levels for nearly half a mile on a south heading with some of the route’s best views. This section overlooks Rocky Mountain’s Wild Basin Area, Mount Copeland (13,176′), Ouzel Peak (12, 12,716′), Mahana Peak (12,632′), Longs Peak (14,259′) and Mt Meeker (13,911′).

Those not aiming for the summit will be content with views along this stretch. The trail exits Rocky Mountain National Park (3.6 miles : 11,335′) and threads a few pockets of krummholz to an unmarked turnoff for St Vrain Mountain. Leave the main trail (3.65 miles : 11,360′) and aim for a band of krummholz approximately 200 yards away. Once through look for cairns and, most importantly, Indian Peaks – Rocky Mountain National Park Boundary posts to your right (north).

St Vrain Mountain (4.45 miles : 12,162′) is rounded with 2 wind shelters and incredible views. Continuing takes you along its west ridge to the Elk Tooth formation and base of Ogallala Peak (13,138′) on the Divide.

Trailhead Directions

Flattop Mountain (12,332′), Front Range

Flattop Mountain (12,332′), Front Range

Flattop Mountain (12,332′), Front Range

Flattop Mountain is located just east of the Continental Divide in Rocky Mountain National Park. The trail was built in 1925, and rehabilitated in 1940 with Civilian Conservation Corps labor. Today it is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The scenic trail has overlooks for Dream and Emerald Lake, and unmatched views of the Longs Peak area to the south. The trail is also used to to reach the summit of Hallett Peak.

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Trail Directions

From the trailhead immediately make a right turn onto the Bear Lake Loop Trail. After a short walk along the eastern shore of Bear Lake, make another right turn at the next junction. From here the trail ascends the slopes of the Bierstadt Moraine.

About .5 miles from the trailhead you’ll reach the Bierstadt Lake and Mill Creek Basin junction. Turn left and continue towards Flattop Mountain. The route turns west as it climbs higher and you’ll enjoy spectacular views of Longs Peak, the Keyboard of the Winds, Pagoda Peak and Chiefs Head Peak towards the south. At just over 1 mile from the trailhead you will arrive at the Flattop Mountain Trail junction, which forks off to the left and begins ascending the eastern slopes of the mountain.

Once on the Flattop Mountain trail, the climb becomes steeper for the rest of the route. About 1.5 miles from the trailhead (~10,500 feet) you will reach the Dream Lake Overlook. Once leaving the Dream Lake overlook it’s a short hike to tree-line. Looking towards the east are views of Bierstadt Lake, Sprague Lake and much of the Glacier Basin area.

After about 3 miles from the trailhead you’ll reach the Emerald Lake Overlook. This scenic overlook rises more than 1,200′ above Emerald Lake. Continue on for less than a mile and you will be just below the summit of Flattop Mountain where there is a horse hitch. The slope begins to become more gradual and eventually leveling out. The end of the Flattop Mountain Trail is at the junction with the North Inlet Trail and Tonahutu Creek Trail. Although there are no signs indicating that you’re at the top, this is the unofficial summit of Flattop Mountain.

Trailhead Directions

La Plata Peak (14,336′), Sawatch Range

La Plata Peak (14,336′), Sawatch Range

La Plata Peak (14,336′), Sawatch Range

La Plata Peak, in the middle of the Sawatch Range, is known for it’s distinctive Ellingwood Ridge, popular among climbers. The Northwest Ridge trail starts from Highway 82 and follows the northern ridge that divides the La Plata basin from La Plata Gulch. There are several other routes to the summit, such as the Southwest Ridge. “La Plata” is Spanish for “The Silver”, a reference to the many silver deposits in the area.

The Sawatch Mountain Range is home to fourteen other 14,000′ peaks, such as Huron Peak, Mt Antero, Missouri Mountain, and the highest peak in the Rocky Mountains, Mt Elbert.

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Know when to turn around. Turned around near 12,000′ due to heavy winds and low visibility, despite what initially appeared to be a picture perfect day.